Stephen Hawking has figured out how to escape a black hole

Christina

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Stephen Hawking says he has figured out how to escape a black hole | Physics-Astronomy

Matter that falls into a black hole is gone forever, right? Well not quite, says Stephen Hawking. Stephen Hawking told this at a public lecture in Stockholm, Sweden, just yesterday. He also said “If you feel you are in a black hole, don’t give up. There’s a way out.” You possibly know that black holes are stars that have shrunken under their own strong gravity, generating gravitational forces so powerful that even light can’t escape. Anything that falls inside is believed to be torn apart by the immense gravity, never to been seen or heard from again ever. What you may not know is that physicists have been arguing for 40 years about what happens to the information about the physical state of those objects once they fall in.
 
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#2
Very interesting considering the recent detection of Gravitational waves and I quote: "According to general relativity, a pair of black holes orbiting around each other lose energy through the emission of gravitational waves, causing them to gradually approach each other over billions of years, and then much more quickly in the final minutes. During the final fraction of a second, the two black holes collide into each other at nearly one-half the speed of light and form a single more massive black hole, converting a portion of the combined black holes’ mass to energy, according to Einstein’s formula E=mc2. This energy is emitted as a final strong burst of gravitational waves. It is these gravitational waves that LIGO has observed." A new door has opened wide: “With this discovery, we humans are embarking on a marvelous new quest: the quest to explore the warped side of the universe—objects and phenomena that are made from warped spacetime. Colliding black holes and gravitational waves are our first beautiful examples,” says Thorne. I think humanity's idea of space and time is in for a major shake up!


info link: News | Gravitational Waves Detected 100 Years After Einstein's Prediction | LIGO Lab | Caltech
 

Martian

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I'm not convinced that black holes are more than fiction. The idea is that the escape velocity equals or exceeds the speed of light, but in order for light to be unable to escape it, it must be affected by gravity. That's all well and good, but there's something nobody seems to talk about: implications for red shift. The red shift of starlight is used to claim that the universe is expanding. However, is it not possible that the gravity of the Earth or sun simply accelerates the light toward us, resulting in red shift from all directions? That doesn't fit the pseudo-religious cosmology they want to sell these days though.
 

Darby

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\ said:
Very interesting considering the recent detection of Gravitational waves and I quote: "According to general relativity, a pair of black holes orbiting around each other lose energy through the emission of gravitational waves, causing them to gradually approach each other over billions of years, and then much more quickly in the final minutes. During the final fraction of a second, the two black holes collide into each other at nearly one-half the speed of light and form a single more massive black hole, converting a portion of the combined black holes’ mass to energy, according to Einstein’s formula E=mc2. This energy is emitted as a final strong burst of gravitational waves. It is these gravitational waves that LIGO has observed." A new door has opened wide: “With this discovery, we humans are embarking on a marvelous new quest: the quest to explore the warped side of the universe—objects and phenomena that are made from warped spacetime. Colliding black holes and gravitational waves are our first beautiful examples,” says Thorne. I think humanity's idea of space and time is in for a major shake up!
This thread has absolutely nothing to do with gravitational waves. It is about Hawking and the conservation of information.


It's an interesting pop-sci article that somewhat correctly states the gist of what Hawking was stating. But beyond "the gist" its a misleading pop-sci treatment. Hawking, in his paper, is attempting to maintain a conservation law by stating that "information" is conserved thus never lost. The article, however, takes that idea and without any scientific support expands it to "if you go into a black hole you can escape" with the implied message of "you can escape intact". BS


That is not the case and it is not what Hawking has said. He has said that "information" goes in and the same information can come back out (eventually). That it comes out one bit at a time, one bit every hundred years, is not in conflict with his thesis. So, if you go in and come back out one atom at a time over the course of a billion years that will be in strict compliance with Hawking's thesis.


Great for the theory but not much use for you if you are literally atomized in the process..
 
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Darby

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In case you don't understand:


Let's suppose that the quantum state of an object falling past the event horizon of a black hole can be stated as "Psi(A) = 123", Great - we have, in our very uncomplicated world, a complete quantum description of "A".


"A" falls into the black hole. Over the course of time "A" is re-emitted from the black hole as a series - 1,1,1,1,...123 times. We have the original state of "123". Wonderful. But at the same time that A fell in B, C and D also fell into the same black hole. Regardless of their initial quantum states they are each also re-emitted as a series of 1,1,1,1...


So you have A, B, C and D, with absolutely zero information lost, having their individual quantum states re-emitted as a net series of 1,1,1,1,1,1,1...


You can't tell one "1" from any other "1" but have all of the original information. However, it is all mixed up and you have no possibility of distinguishing a "1" from A from a "1" from B, C or D. The information is perfectly conserved but it is of no use to you. Hawking's complete thesis clearly makes that statement.


That the quantum state of a chrononaught entering into a black hole is conserved is in no way the same as saying that you can enter a black hole, exit and live to tell about it. That idea is most definitely whistling in the dark.
 
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Christina

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\ said:
In case you don't understand:
Let's suppose that the quantum state of an object falling past the event horizon of a black hole can be stated as "Psi(A) = 123", Great - we have, in our very uncomplicated world, a complete quantum description of "A".


"A" falls into the black hole. Over the course of time "A" is re-emitted from the black hole as a series - 1,1,1,1,...123 times. We have the original state of "123". Wonderful. But at the same time that A fell in B, C and D also fell into the same black hole. Regardless of their initial quantum states they are each also re-emitted as a series of 1,1,1,1...


So you have A, B, C and D, with absolutely zero information lost, having their individual quantum states re-emitted as a net series of 1,1,1,1,1,1,1...


You can't tell one "1" from any other "1" but have all of the original information. However, it is all mixed up and you have no possibility of distinguishing a "1" from A from a "1" from B, C or D. The information is perfectly conserved but it is of no use to you. Hawking's complete thesis clearly makes that statement.


That the quantum state of a chrononaught entering into a black hole is conserved is in no way the same as saying that you can enter a black hole, exit and live to tell about it. That idea is most definitely whistling in the dark.
Crazy, I didnt know you were a physicist now.


Care to provide proof that you are the expert you claim to be??


::sips coffee::
 
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#9
\ said:
In case you don't understand:
Let's suppose that the quantum state of an object falling past the event horizon of a black hole can be stated as "Psi(A) = 123", Great - we have, in our very uncomplicated world, a complete quantum description of "A".


"A" falls into the black hole. Over the course of time "A" is re-emitted from the black hole as a series - 1,1,1,1,...123 times. We have the original state of "123". Wonderful. But at the same time that A fell in B, C and D also fell into the same black hole. Regardless of their initial quantum states they are each also re-emitted as a series of 1,1,1,1...


So you have A, B, C and D, with absolutely zero information lost, having their individual quantum states re-emitted as a net series of 1,1,1,1,1,1,1...


You can't tell one "1" from any other "1" but have all of the original information. However, it is all mixed up and you have no possibility of distinguishing a "1" from A from a "1" from B, C or D. The information is perfectly conserved but it is of no use to you. Hawking's complete thesis clearly makes that statement.


That the quantum state of a chrononaught entering into a black hole is conserved is in no way the same as saying that you can enter a black hole, exit and live to tell about it. That idea is most definitely whistling in the dark.