Fourth Ammendment Voided. Our failure to insist upon constitutional law is upon us.

titorite

New member
Jun 22, 2007
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Central Texas yall
#1
I would like to inform you that the snowden revelations should be your wake up call, or Formal ANNOUNCEMENT of the new reality and new deal.

Their is no fourth amendment if the government system disregards it. The NSA is not only catoluging everything written online, but all your cell calls, all our __af_placement_id--[AFF-PLACEMENT-ID].html']cordless phone calls, your texts, when you hang up your phone, the mic is still on, and still recording. MUffled though it may be in its slot or pocket or whatever, it is still on and recording and transmitting back to the NSA. The Stop light camera at every intersection is watching you. The ATM machine cameras are transmitting. Remember that Chris Dorner was not only tracked by that system but that the LAPD swat team was excused for flying 3 counties outside their jurisdiction and executing him.

The NSAs mandate itself is to listen by all means possible and where impeaded, invent new ways to ease drop, like Angry birds malware or USB tansmitters.

Their is no fourth amendment.

It is dead. GOne. Disrespected and ignored. Pointless. Superflous Ortemental. Fake. A lie. Currently the fourth amendment is a lie.
 

Orbital

New member
Aug 8, 2014
27
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#2
Pssst....it's all make-believe.

And there is a 4th amendment. Just not being regarded as conscientiously as it needs to be.
 

titorite

New member
Jun 22, 2007
703
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Central Texas yall
#3
Our unwillingness to adhere to constitutional law is why thug enforcement and legislative pigs disregard it. And if the legislators and cops have no regard for the law then what is law?
 
Aug 15, 2014
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Chicago, IL
#4
This is absolute nonsense.

If this were true, it would take every person in the United States sorting 24 hours a day to be able to sift through the shear volume of information.

The NSA is troubling and certainly is a violation of the Fourth Amendment, whether the Supreme Court ever declares its policies so or not. But alarmist speech like this doesn't accomplish anything and only discredits an otherwise valid viewpoint.

Moz
 

Darby

New member
Mar 8, 2001
5,929
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#5
Holy crap! Titorite and I agree on something! :)

Time Will,

No, it wouldn't take everyone sifting through anything. These are digital files and NSA has the best that super computing has to offer. If they didn't have a plan to effectively and reasonably quickly recover specific information they would not be collecting it. Google and Microsoft have both been fully cooperating with the current administration in this endeavor.

The Supreme Court, at least in "normal" criminal cases, has historically stretched the meaning of both the 1st and the 4th Amendments far beyond their original intent to cover a host of situations that are neither what most people would consider communication nor property, person or things. Should the Court now consider the vast, unlimited, warrantless and random collection of any information concerning our communications as "reasonable searches and seizures based upon probable cause" would be downright frightening. The fact that the current administration does not seem to have a problem with it is downright frightening. And yes, I'm aware that this program pre-dates Obama. What does not pre-date him is the expansion of the program to collect information on everyone and not just specific targets or classes of specific targets.

And it's also frightening that the news media in the US fell back into line, dropping the item completely from the news, after they discovered that they were specifically targeted.

If you ask people today why Richard Nixon finally resigned rather than letting the Impeachment go forward they'd probably say that it was the Watergate burglary and the cover-up. They'd be wrong. Nixon just got caught but both parties had been pulling those tricks for a while. The RNC HQ was burglarized in 1956.

No, it was Article II of the Articles of Impeachment that sunk him. Abuse of Power. It was his use of the US intelligence agencies to spy on his domestic political enemies and his use of the IRS to punish them. Any of this sound familiar?

The 1st and 4th Amendments have been under attack by the Executive branch of the Federal government for quite some time.
 
Sep 27, 2014
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#8
There were whistleblowers before Snowden, and there will be more after him. He just happened to get his message to a wider audience. The real wake-up call is for people to stop feeling helpless and either make government serve us or replace them. Also, learn the technologies in detail so you're not a victim of them.
 
G

Guest

Guest
#9
\ said:
Also, learn the technologies in detail so you're not a victim of them.
It amazes me how much people trust their iPhones or Facebook, then act surprised when someone like Snowden brings up the fact that they're being monitored.

Unfortunately, the response is usually "well, I'm not doing anything wrong, so whatever...".
 

PaulaJedi

Moderator
Staff member
Jan 17, 2014
2,051
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Zeta Reticuli
www.microsingularity.net
#10
Cosmo, I know this is an old thread, but are you able to edit the titles at all to fix spelling errors?

Unfortunately, the response is usually "well, I'm not doing anything wrong, so whatever...".
That's usually my response, but what are we supposed to do? I love my technology and am not going to live paranoid, ya know?

They're going to be pretty bored watching me unless they like all this time travel stuff.